New Business Cleans Up

Trauma Services Brings Biohazard Specialization To Timberville

Posted: January 9, 2013

J.D. Davis, who launched Trauma Scene Recovery Services LLC, along with his wife, Maggie (below), in 2010, is now operating out of Timberville. Tasked with cleaning up following a death, suicide or assault, Davis says the business calls for a “hard stomach,” and that, while most would hope they’ll never need his services, the business plays an important role in keeping area residents safe. (Photo by Aimee George)
J.D. Davis, who launched Trauma Scene Recovery Services LLC, along with his wife, Maggie (below), in 2010, is now operating out of Timberville. Tasked with cleaning up following a death, suicide or assault, Davis says the business calls for a “hard stomach,” and that, while most would hope they’ll never need his services, the business plays an important role in keeping area residents safe. (Photo by Aimee George)

“The last job that God handed out.” That’s how J.D. Davis describes Trauma Scene Recovery Services LLC.


Davis and his wife Maggie launched the business in 2010, after J.D.’s retirement from the U.S. Army after 29 years. Maggie wanted to move closer to her hometown of Broadway, so they now operate the business from their home.

The Davises are on-call 24/7 and will respond to anyone in Virginia who is in need of cleanup from traumatic scenarios, specifically,  those “involving unattended death, suicide, assault, etc.”

Davis and his wife began to research the field after getting information from a cousin in Florida who owns a similar business. After the move “back home,” Davis wanted to work part-time offering his services to the community.

“This type of business began to grow rapidly as the awareness of HIV/AIDS spread across the U.S.,” said Davis.

He said he knew the work would be a good fit for his skill set because of his experience with nuclear, biological and chemical decontamination and protection services in the Army. His concern was not whether he could deal with the demanding job, but if Maggie could work in the environment.

“It takes a hard stomach,” said J.D., “and a capacity for distancing [yourself from the job] ... it is physically exhausting, dangerous work,” he said, emphasizing the importance of safely and properly cleaning a hazardous site.

“When you get down to it, it’s just dirty grimy cleaning — like cleaning a toilet, but blood can find its way anywhere, and it needs to be cleaned carefully and professionally to avoid contamination to yourself and others,” he said.

The Davises say they are fully certified and equipped with proper supplies and disposal techniques to rid a space of contaminants. Many do not know that most homeowners insurance covers such expenses, as well as items that need replacing.

Above all, Davis says, it is important to keep emotion out of the equation because the “most important aspect is dealing with families, keeping them calm and explaining what we are doing.
“In addition to being biohazard technicians, we have to be grief counselors, friends and advisers — this is where we need to have our compassionate nature come into play. Almost all customers are in a state of shock and we want people to know we are there if they need us,” he said.

Trauma Scene Recovery Services can be reached by phone at (540) 333-2006 or by emailing ceotsrs@gmail.com. The website, traumascenerecoverysvcs.com, is coming soon.
 

Contact Aimee George at 574-6292 or scole@dnronline.com.



Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
NDN Video News
Advertisement
Specials