It Started With Roosevelt

Posted: September 28, 2013

On Jan. 11, 1944, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt stated that our founders left the Constitution bare with regards for what people had a right to expect from their government. He outlined eight “rights” that he and the progressives of that time determined should be expected by all U.S. citizens. (Photo by Associated Press)
This past week, we were treated to the forcible removal of Robert Small from a school board meeting in Towson, Md. Mr. Small was at the meeting as a concerned parent. The school district was discussing the adaption of Common Core curriculum for the local schools. Mr. Small, against protocol, stood up to question the school board directly, rather than submit a written question. He was forcibly removed because the school board did not want to have a debate about Common Core (CC). Their format for submitting questions ensured that. Why would they not want a debate about CC?

On Jan. 11, 1944, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt stated that our founders left the Constitution bare with regards for what people had a right to expect from their government. He outlined eight “rights” that he and the progressives of that time determined should be expected by all U.S. citizens. The eighth right he mentioned was the right to a good education. Being that education was not mentioned in the U.S. constitution, education was, in 1944, a state-by-state issue. And it remained that way until President Eisenhower created the Department of Health, Education and Welfare in 1953.  President Jimmy Carter, in 1979 separated the Department of Education from Eisenhower’s creation. States then became reliant upon the federal government to subsidize their education budgets, particularly if a cost was incurred as a result of complying with federal mandates upon the state’s education.

Common Core is a non-profit group, which has, in conjunction with federal government, created learning curricula. The collaboration with the government is under the auspices that all children should be equally educated. This simply is not possible. All brains are not created equal, which means it is impossible to impart equal knowledge. For that reason alone, any money spent in pursuit of equally educated children is wasted.

Mr. Small rose to question the elected members of the school board for his district. This board of elected officials did not want to receive open questions regarding their intent to adapt a curriculum that might not be best for his children. They had already decided what they would do. The meeting was simply window dressing. Through Common Core, the government is attempting to take over education. By the same manner in which the government has taken over healthcare, home schooling, private schools and localities not submitting to CC will eventually be the next battleground.

Here is the question for everyone who wants to have some say about how their child is educated: How far will you let this go? If you are not active and informed about the education your child is receiving, then you are already a co-conspirator, willing or not, with this plan.

For those who care but have yet to voice their concern, the longer you wait the closer we get to education going the way of health care. That means the cost to educate your child will go up while the value of their education goes down. Maybe we’ll see bronze (cheap) education plans for the basics, and platinum (expensive) plans that will assure acceptance to the college of choice. Non participants will of course have to pay a penalty. Is CC another of these things we have to adopt to see what’s in it? Still wonder why they didn’t want open questions?

As for the other seven “rights” for which Roosevelt pined:

1. A useful and fair paying job;

2. Earn enough to provide adequate food and clothing and recreation;

3. Every farmer will earn a decent living;

4. Free trade for every businessman;

5. Every family have a decent home;

6. Adequate medical care;

7. Protection from the economic fears of old age, sickness, accident, and unemployment.

Look at what a progressive government has done in each of these areas. The challenge is to find any that have been a success when viewed through the lens of federalism.

Mr. Dean lives in Elkton.



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