Why The GOP Says No

Posted: October 17, 2013

Let us remember the genesis of this two-week partial shutdown of government: Republican aversion to ObamaCare. We provided, anew, the reasons for said aversion. Reiterating why Republicans went out on such a limb politically to see what might be done to change this status quo may sound superfluous. The late Sen. Harry F. Byrd Jr., called it a “calculated redundancy.”

So why did Republicans decide to stand up? Simple: Because, as one wag put it, they deem ObamaCare an “abomination,” a profligate gesture a nation nearly $17 trillion in debt can ill afford.

Forget the glitches in implementation. Long before they would become apparent, even Democrats — Sen. Max Baucus, for one — sensed a “train wreck” coming down the tracks. How could this law be otherwise when its provisions slam millions of Americans with increased premium costs, disrupts (forever?) the traditional expectations of the doctor-patient relationship, and wreaks havoc on another tradition, the 40-hour work week?

So what choice did fearful Republicans have? Surrender meekly, or see what could be done constitutionally to effect a change? They chose the latter. What they did not do was shut down the government. Three times they voted to fund every agency and program, save that of ObamaCare. And only once did they vote to outright defund that “abomination.”

That is the truth, and the reason we counter the mainstream media’s version of events — i.e., Republicans shut down the government — with “calculated redundancy.”



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