HARRISONBURG — City Council has a lengthy meeting coming up Tuesday evening, which includes 10 public hearings and eight regular agenda items.

The first public hearing will be to consider issuing up to an $8 million bond to partially finance the Harrisonburg-Rockingham Community Services Board project.

The board has been planning an expansion and construction project due to its space problem.

City documents say the amount to be borrowed is anticipated to be less. While the city will issue half off the required construction funds, the county will also issue the other half, documents show.

Director of Communications Michael Parks said Friday that the complete cost hasn’t been established yet.

“As bids are reviewed for the project, that figure will come into focus,” he said.

The CSB, which provides mental health, intellectual disability and substance abuse services, operates out of five buildings on its 4-acre campus at 1241 N. Main St. in the city. The site includes the Arbor House, the McNulty Center on Washington Street and the Summit House on Pear Street.

The annual net debt service beginning in fiscal year 2021 would be approximately $375,000 to $415,000 each year dependent on market rates of interest and the final amount borrowed, city documents show. In fiscal year 2020 there would only be a half-year payment, for which the city currently has $250,000 included in its budget.

Staff recommends approval of the bond.

Council will also hold a public hearing to consider establishing a new zoning district to the city’s ordinance, titled R-8, which would be a small lot residential district.

The applicant, Richard Blackwell, discussed the idea with staff in early 2017 which would be for the development of single-family detached neighborhoods and would allow for higher density development for small lot sizes than what the zoning ordinance currently allows, city documents say.

The city has 11 zoning classifications that allow residential uses, which include:

R-1, single-family residential district

R-2, residential district

R-3, multiple dwelling residential district

R-3, medium density residential district

R-4, planned unit residential district

R-5, high density residential district

R-6, low density mixed residential planned community

R-7, medium density mixed residential planned community

MX-U, mixed use planned community district

U-R, urban residential district

B-1, central business district

Staff and Planning Commission have recommended approval.

A public hearing will take place to modify a zoning ordinance, which currently require community centers, libraries, museums and other similar facilities to provide one parking space for each 250 square feet of building gross floor area.

The hearing will take place to eliminate the minimum off-street parking requirements for community centers associated with housing developments.

Staff and Planning Commission recommended approval.

There will be another public hearing to consider a request from Sierra Valley Resources LLC for a special-use permit to allow recreational and leisure activities on around 1.5 acres located at 785 Acorn Drive.

The property is a warehouse building, which is zoned as a general industrial district.

If approved, Edge Effect Fitness LLC will create a training facility offering “affordable, inclusive fitness programs to those who needs may not be met in a typical gym setting, would locate at the site.”

Different programs, including Rock Steady Boxing, which is an exercise program for people with Parkinson’s disease; ExRX, which is a medically referred personal training program; personal training and specialized group training.

Council will also hold a public hearing for three requests for a special-use permit to allow for a short-term rental.

The requested rentals are at 1451 Hillcrest Drive, 341 S. Willow St. and 981 Summit Ave.

The last public hearing slated for Tuesday will be an amendment to the city’s code to increase water and sewer rates in order to meet revenue projections for the fiscal year 2019-20 budget.

The increase in water rates and minimum charges will generate an increase in revenues of around $588,000, which will help fund the Shenandoah Raw Waterline Project, city documents state.

City Council will consider setting new rates for emergency medical services transportation. Council last set the rates Aug. 25, 2009.

The new rates will go into effect July 1.

Council will also be given a presentation on the Harrisonburg Conservation Program.

The Public Works Department is expanding its current stormwater management program to include the Harrisonburg Conservation Assistance Program.

The new program provides opportunities for small water quality projects to be implemented throughout the city and gives private property owners additional options for the management of drainage concerns, city documents say.

Council will receive an update on the Raw Water Supply Management Plan, which addresses Dry River, North River, South Fork Shenandoah River, Silver Lake and other future sources of raw water supply.

The board will also consider a supplemental appropriation of $180,000 for the city’s share of court renovations and a reallocation of $30,212.87 in the School Capital Funds.

Documents say at the conclusion of the Bluestone Elementary School project and Elon Rhodes Early Learning Center project, there was leftover funding that will be reallocated into the new high school capital project account.

City Council will meet at 7 p.m. in City Hall, 409 S. Main St.

Contact Laine Griffin at 574-6286 or lgriffin@dnronline.com. Follow Laine on Twitter @laine_griffDNR

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